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Posts with the tag blogging:

Adding syntax highlighting to Ghost with highlight.js

After my recent relooking, I finally took the time to add syntax highlighting for code snippets.

While Ghost doesn’t support code syntax highlighting out the box, it lays down the groundwork for it.

Moving to a new domain name

Following my recent design revamp, I took the opportunity to do another major change: migrate my blog to a new domain name. If you’re reading this you’re probably not coming from a search engine and probably know me and my work at least little. I started blogging in 2014 when I was still in high school. At that time, I was writing in french on angristan.fr. Two years ago, I decided to be more coherent with the fact that English is ubiquitous in my life and moved here to write in English.

A new look

Two years ago, when I introduced my custom theme, I said I was still considering using another theme. I didn’t find anything that fit my taste for a while, but the time has finally come! As a refresher, since I started this blog I have been running my fork of the default Ghost theme. It is open-source an available on GitHub. The default theme is great and well maintained. Since 2018, the theme has evolved quite a lot, so I updated the original post with an addition screenshot I took yesterday, if you’re curious.

How to migrate Ghost (and Isso) to dated permalinks

I’ve never used date in my blog posts URLs because I thought it looked nicer and was better for SEO. Recently, I changed my mind and I find it better to have the date in the permalink. Not necessarily as precise as to put the day, but as least the year and month. What I want to achieve is this: https://angristan.xyz/understand-k8s/ -> https://angristan.xyz/2020/01/understand-k8s/ Ghost once had a toggle in the settings to enable dated permalinks, but it’s gone now and it’s off by default.

Migrating comments from Isso to Disqus

I’ve been using Isso since I launched this blog and it’s been working very well but I still much prefer the Disqus experience. I didn’t find anything on the web about migrating from Isso to Disqus, which is to be expected. So I made my own tool, and I’m happy to report it works! Isso stores comments in an SQLite database. To import our comments on Disqus, we will have to somehow generate a XML file that matches their custom XML format, which is based on the WXR (WordPress eXtended RSS) schema.

2 years of blogging in English

Just a quick note to mark the 2 years of this blog. Well, it was four days ago, but I missed it. But who cares, right? I’ve written much less than I expected this past year, partly because I’ve been very busy with school (and didn’t get a summer break), but also because for the second part of the year I went abroad. Living and studying in South Korea was a life-changing experience.

The first year of this blog

I’m 3 weeks late but I wanted to make this post to mark the 1st anniversary of this blog. Many of my readers speak french and probably know me from my french blog, which I opened four and a half years ago. As I grew up, my digital environment became more and more english-speaking. I have gotten better at english although I’m still lacking a lot in my writing. On the internet, I mostly read, listen and watch english content, and interact with people in english most of the time.

Migrating Ghost to Docker

In my first post I said I installed Ghost with ghost-cli, the classic way. I did also say that I wanted to run it in Docker but that I didn’t know Docker enough to do it. In fact, I tried to set up Ghost in Docker a few times while being bored at school, but I didn’t succeed, so it ended up like it is now. For the past week though, I’ve been learning and using Docker a lot, and finally moved a dozen services into containers.

Migrating Ghost from MySQL to SQLite

In my first post, I said that I set up my Ghost blog with a MySQL database. Why is that? Because ghost-cli wants you to use a MySQL database and I happened to have a MariaDB server on my VM and so I just added another database to it SQLite is a better choice However, Ghost supports SQlite as a storage backend. In fact, SQLite can handle more load than this blog could ever have, considering I use Nginx cache on my reverse proxy.

My custom Ghost theme

.notice{padding:18px;line-height:24px;margin-bottom:24px;border-radius:4px;color:#444;background:#e7f2fa}.notice p:last-child{margin-bottom:0}.notice-title{margin:-18px -18px 12px;padding:4px 18px;border-radius:4px 4px 0 0;font-weight:700;color:#fff;background:#6ab0de}.notice.warning .notice-title{background:rgba(217,83,79,.9)}.notice.warning{background:#fae2e2}.notice.info .notice-title{background:#f0b37e}.notice.info{background:#fff2db}.notice.note .notice-title{background:#6ab0de}.notice.note{background:#e7f2fA}.notice.tip .notice-title{background:rgba(92,184,92,.8)}.notice.tip{background:#e6f9e6}.icon-notice{display:inline-flex;align-self:center;margin-right:8px}.icon-notice img,.icon-notice svg{height:1em;width:1em;fill:currentColor}.icon-notice img,.icon-notice.baseline svg{top:0.125em;position:relative} Note 05/2020 update: I moved to a new theme. The one described in this post is still open source although not maintained. For the record, here is how it looked before I stopped using it: As I said in my introduction post, the default theme for Ghost, Casper, as been reworked a few months ago a looks very good now.